Sheila O'Malley

Griffith's 'Intolerance,' a foundational film that's also a great one, at Film Forum:

Playing this week in a brand new restoration at the Film Forum, with a new effective score by Carl Davis (conducted by Davis and performed by The Luxembourg Radio Symphony Orchestra), Intolerance is almost 100 years old and is an extraordinary accomplishment, and far more than a curiosity, or just an artifact of cinema's beginnings.

Bio: Sheila O'Malley's work has appeared in The Sewanee Review and Salon.com. She writes a monthly essay on film for Fandor, and also contributes pieces to The House Next Door, official blog of Slant Magazine. She contributes occasional reviews of film noir classics at Noir of the Week. Her personal blog is The Sheila Variations.

Latest Articles:

Article

Griffith’s ‘Intolerance,’ a foundational film that’s also a great one, at Film Forum

Playing this week in a brand new restoration at the Film Forum, with a new effective score by Carl Davis (conducted by Davis and performed by The Luxembourg Radio Symphony Orchestra), Intolerance is almost 100 years old and is an extraordinary accomplishment, and far more than a curiosity, or just an artifact of cinema's beginnings.

Aug. 5, 2013

 
Article

James Gandolfini, on the New York stage

I am thinking now of Gandolfini standing up, charging across the stage, ripping off his jacket, and I am thinking of the sound of 1,000 people gasping at the same time at the sheer force of his movement and gesture, at the sheer power of his personality and intention. That is who Gandolfini was. That is what he brought to the stage, or to the shoot, to every single thing he did.

Jun. 20, 2013

 
Article

At the Tribeca Film Festival: Will Forte’s surprising, successful dramatic debut

It could have been played for melodrama or maudlin sentimentality at every turn, but it isn't. Instead, it is a sensitive and often quite funny look at what Conor's re-entry does to his wife Vanetia (the wonderful red-headed Maxine Peake), and his two young children. Meanwhile, there is an interloper (Forte) in their midst, following Conor around with a cam-corder. Vanetia says, "I was worried about letting a hypothesis into the house."

Apr. 29, 2013

 
Article

At the Tribeca Film Festival: A message to you from a West Virginia town ruined by Oxycontin

The people of Oxyana speak for themselves; Dunne is listening, and the community trusts him, so he has gotten under the suffice of things. He is their message in a bottle. But there is work for the audience here.

Apr. 26, 2013

 
Article

At the Tribeca Film Festival: A bold, risky film from Quebec produces a revelatory performance from Thomas Haden Church

Whitewash was shot in northern Quebec, and Church is clearly really out there, in a real wilderness, with real snow drifts that swallow him up. He struggles with branches, he builds fires, he tries to carry bags of groceries and cans of gasoline through the deep drifts.

Apr. 23, 2013

 
Article

At the Tribeca Film Festival: From Taiwan, a very serious comedy about love’s hopes and sadnesses

Chen leads us through the shoals of these troubled relationships with a light grip, an affection for every character, and an acceptance that romantic possibility can actually make the world look different, magic, funny, unexpected.

Apr. 22, 2013

 
Article

At the Tribeca Film Festival: ‘The King of Comedy’

What is it about fame? What do these people want? Rupert Pupkin (or "Pumpkin," "Pipkin," or any of the other incorrect names he is called during the course of the film) is alive and well, more vigorous now than he was in 1983.

Apr. 18, 2013

 
Article

‘Polisse’: What could a child-protection officer possibly do for fun?

"You try to handle it on a case-by-case basis," one member of Paris' Child Protection Unit says, when asked about the emotional implications of his job.

May. 18, 2012

 
Article

‘Rubberneck’: Alex Karpovsky on the dark side of nice

Alex Karpovsky is everywhere right now. Along with being a series regular on Lena Dunham's new HBO series Girls (he also appeared in her first feature, Tiny Furniture), he continues to be a strong presence in independent cinema, acting, directing, and writing.

Apr. 28, 2012

 
Article

Shawn Christensen on the inspiration and luck that led him to Fatima Ptacek, and ‘Curfew’

"She's very disciplined ... She happens to live down the street from me in Queens so we had three or four rehearsals before shooting and she was great."

Apr. 25, 2012