Quinn on the merits of Cuomo’s gun proposal, and the N.R.A.'s

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Governor Andrew Cuomo told The New York Times that "confiscation could be an option" in order to get privately owned assault weapons out of circulation in New York.

The Drudge-ready idea got an initial endorsement from New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, a likely Democratic candidate for mayor next year.

"I am open to looking at all of the suggestions the governor has put out there," Quinn said today, when I asked her about the comment.

Quinn was speaking in City Hall, where she joined her Council colleagues in releasing a report recommending more mental health and social-service programs in high-crime areas to reduce gun violence.

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"I think he raises a very valid point," Quinn said of Cuomo. "If tomorrow, the assault weapons ban went back in, you still have assault weapons out there. Guns like the one used in Connecticut, that should have just never been on the street. And I think it is an important thing for us to explore how we take those back off of the street so they don't just keep getting moved around between the hands of different bad guys and bad people and causing more lives to be lost."

Asked about the N.R.A.'s proposal earlier today to put armed guards in "every single school in the nation," Quinn said it was "asinine." 

Councilman Jumaane Williams, co-chair of the task force that released its findings today with Quinn, said, "The N.R.A. are idiots."

Also at the press conference was Jackie Rowe-Adams, the executive director of Harlem Mothers SAVE, who lost two children to gun-related violence.

"You are murderers. You killed my two kids," she said of the N.R.A. "You killed so many other kids. You have taken the lives of so many and now you stand up and say we need more guns, we need more armed guards. How dare you!"

Before the announcement, I ran into New York City Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott outside City Hall. He declined to comment on the N.R.A.'s call for armed guards at schools.

CORRECTION: The original version of this article incorrectly identified Jackie Rowe-Adams as Jackie Hilly.