Consultant: For Quinn’s sake, Bloomberg shouldn’t joke about a fourth term

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The day after it was reported that he asked Hillary Clinton to consider running for mayor, Michael Bloomberg sought to demonstrate that his confidence in Christine Quinn was still intact.

Bloomberg joked at the time that he considered seeking a fourth term, but was talked out of it by Quinn.

That joke hurt more than the reported call to Clinton, according to Democratic political consultant Bruce Gyory.

In an interview on "Inside City Hall" last night, Gyrory said, "I thought last week his joking about the fourth term and term limits hurt her more than the phone call. That term-limits question is not a joking matter to primary voters. The polling data is replete. They thought it was a mistake. They didn't like that their two referendums were so summarily overturned by the City Council. And they also have a sense that there has been a drift in this administration and has not been as on top of things as it was [in] its first two."

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At the press conference where Bloomberg jokingly recalled pondering a fourth term, "Quinn made a face and motioned with her hand to suggest Bloomberg was talking crazy."

The idea of a grab for a fourth term has periodically bubbled up, to Bloomberg's annoyance, ever since he successfully got the City Council to change the city's law limiting the number of consecutive terms a city lawmaker can serve in office from two to three.

In July of 2009, while he was running for a third term, New York 1 reporter Josh Robin (who was coincidentally interviewing Gyory last night) asked Bloomberg, "Is there any guarantee that you're not going to run after, presumably, you win this time?"

"The law doesn't permit it," Bloomberg replied.

Robin noted, "It didn't permit it previously, though."

During a radio interview the following day, Bloomberg, tried to make light of the question. Robin then tweeted, "Bloomy thought I was kidding. (I wasn't)."

And in March of 2010, a Quinnipiac poll suggested Bloomberg would not be favored to win re-election if he sought a fourth term.