Beating the bus bridge, or not: Post-Sandy commute adventures on train, bus and bike

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Some New Yorkers today are spending well over an hour trying to execute commutes that are usually a matter of minutes.

Driving is a mess, as Lisa Colangelo laments: "Ran out of gas looking for gas in Queens."

Brooklyn isn't much better.

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The Triborough/RFK Bridge, seen here from the Astoria side, was basically a parking lot this morning.

The traffic lights were "timed better" on the Upper East Side, where there were "wide open streets everywhere" this morning, according to Jill Colvin of DNAinfo.

At this unidentified six-way intersection "downtown," there was no operational traffic light, as of 11 a.m., according to the Wall Street Journal's sports columnist, Jason Gay.

The N train was "flawless" this morning, said writer Matt Flegenheimer. Another person said it was "running fine." 

In Manhattan, the 1 train from 96th Street was "very crowded but not insane," according to a Times editor, Michael Paulson.

On the 4/5/6 lines at 86th Street on the Upper East Side, Andrew Siff is hearing appreciative groans from riders who are glad their long commutes aren't costing them anything.

In Brooklyn, one Ditmas Park resident left home at 6:30 and arrived at 37th Street and 7th Avenue in Manhattan at 8:30 a.m. The commute involved an short F train ride, more than one bus, and some time "crawling" in traffic.

The line for the F train was intense.

Lefferts Gardens resident Tom Randall took one car to the Brooklyn Bridge and another car to go over it, since the first driver was afraid of getting caught in all the traffic.

Biking from Park Slope to Midtown "was an easy 45 minutes. Beats the lines at the bridge bus!" cheered SubwayDoodle.

One recommended bike route into Midtown: "Vanderbilt>Flushing>Manhattan Bridge>Bowery>Bleecker>6thAve."

The line by the bridge was very long.

 Once inside the bus, it wasn't so bad.

By the new Barclays Center, the lines were "crazy."

And Grand Central Terminal looked repopulated.