Obama and the vindication of a small-footprint strategy

President Obama (Pete Souza via flickr)
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President Obama, again, is taking an opportunity to declare a sort of understated victory over a foreign enemy—in this case Moammar Khadafy—but also over the Mission Accomplished, robust unilateralism of the Bush administration. As one aide put it, Obama "uses U.S. military power in a more focused way with smaller footprints."

That means less cost to American taxpayers and, more importantly, fewer American soldiers put in danger, which could bolster domestic support for the president's agenda.

Still, whatever public good feelings exists over the demise of the Libyan dictator will be put to the test as the country now comes to grips with an uncertain future, as David Kirkpatrick explains in the Times.

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An unnamed aide said President Barack Obama "uses U.S. military power in a more focused way with smaller footprints" than his predecessor, George W. Bush. [Scott Wilson and Karen DeYoung]

The future of Libya is uncertain since it has no national institutions, and the Arab Spring is complicated. [David Kirkpatrick]

Governor Andrew Cuomo's selection committee picked Joe Lhota to run the MTA in part because of his local knowledge and Republican ties. [Jeremy Smerd and Shane Dixon Kavanagh]

Editors praise the man Cuomo ousted for Lhota. [New York Post]

"A spokesman for Mr. Cuomo declined to make Mr. Lhota available for an interview." [Andrew Grossman]

There's a FOIL request to find out who met with Cuomo during two meetings about fracking. [Brian Nearing]

Queens lawmakers want Silicon Alley in their borough and will press City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Bloomberg and Cuomo on it. [Nicholas Hirshon]

"[Bloomberg's] spokesman said the joke was intended as a jab at the press corps the mayor finds so pesky." [Sally Goldenberg]

So far, there's no consensus candidate to be the FDNY federal monitor. [Mitchel Maddux]