Seth Meyers, Jimmy Fallon shape late night plans

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Jimmy Fallon. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, file)
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Alex Weprin

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Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers are beginning to reveal their plans as the new hosts of NBC's "The Tonight Show" and "Late Night."

At the Television Critics Association Winter press tour in Pasadena Sunday afternoon, NBC announced that U2 and Will Smith would be the guests on Fallon's first night as "Tonight Show" host, while Meyers has friend and fellow network staple Amy Poehler. 

Fallon also revealed that he told New Jersey Governor Chris Christie in advance about his "Christiegate" duet with Bruce Springsteen (watch it here), in which the Governor was roundly mocked for the bridge scandal. Christie has appeared on Fallon's show both as a guest and in comedy skits, including a "Slow Jam the News" segment.

Fallon has already said that his "Tonight Show" will not be too different from his "Late Night." Meyers, on the other hand, delved into more details on his broadcast.

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"We are going to have a monologue, guests, music, comedian, but the biggest way we can define ourselves is the two or three acts of comedy before the guests come out," Meyers told the assembled critics and reporters, as reported by USA Today's Gary Levin

Meyers will be poaching one of his "Saturday Night Live" Weekend Update writers with him, and plans to feature more topical political and news commentary. He also expects to have "characters" visit the desk, as they do on "Weekend Update" with "Stefon" and "Drunk Uncle." In other words, his program will look a lot more like his "S.N.L." segment than it does Fallon's version of "Late Night."

Meyers addressed the legacy question:

"The legacy of late night is you get to do weird things, people are more patient with it,” he said, adding that "If you get hung up on the legacy of what you're taking over, it's tough to do the work."

Elsewhere, NBC announced that it would be doing a live version of "Peter Pan" this December, following the success of last year's "Sound of Music Live!" Also, NBC entertainment chief Bob Greenblatt announced that the network would be renewing critical darling "Parks and Recreation" for a seventh season, and commented on whether NBC bid on the Thursday night N.F.L. package that is being offered by the football league.

"We'd love to have more N.F.L. games and Thursday night games might be really interesting to us," he said, according to The Hollywood Reporter.