Trayvon Martin dominates the news cycle, plus: Murdoch scandal porn; who wants to buy ‘Variety’?

All eyes are on the family of Trayvon Martin, and a town in Florida. ()
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The Lineup collects the media stories, big and small, that are on our radar each day.

The public interest

The Feb. 26 shooting death of Trayvon Martin has reached that level of news event where it seems like it's all you're watching or reading about.

A new analysis by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press confirms the obvious: The U.S. public is intensely interested in this story.

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A quarter of Americans followed news about Martin more closely than any other story last week, according to the analysis:

Though the shooting occurred on Feb. 26, the controversy developed into a major national story last week amid debates about racial attitudes and crime, the thoroughness of the police investigation and a Florida law that allows people to defend themselves with deadly force under certain circumstances. News about the incident and its aftermath topped coverage as well, accounting for 19% of the newshole, according to a separate analysis by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. News about the presidential campaign accounted for 17% of coverage.

Scandal porn

After weeks of heavy promotion, Frontline's big Lowell Bergman expose on Rupert Murdoch and the News Corp. phone-hacking saga aired on PBS last night.

It is also available online. You can watch the full, hour-long special, "Murdoch's Scandal," below:

Watch Murdoch's Scandal on PBS. See more from FRONTLINE.

And the winner is...

CNN anchor Anderson Cooper has been selected as the emcee for this year's Mirror Awards, the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications' annual lunch-time fete honoring excellence in media reporting.

This year's ceremony, the sixth of its kind, is scheduled for June 13 at Manhattan's Plaza Hotel.

Last year, Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski were hosts. The year before that, it was Katie Couric.

Ditching print

Outgoing Times of London columnist Anatole Kaletsky, whose long journalism career also includes stints at The Financial Times and The Economist, is joining Reuters.

“I am delighted to be joining Reuters because I believe that news and analysis for business readers and policymakers is shifting irrevocably from print to digital,” he said in a statement distributed by the news agency this morning. “After 35 years of working in print media, it will be exciting to work for a company that is constantly evolving to meet the needs of its readers and is determined to ensure the survival of quality journalism in the internet age."

Kaletsky is the latest in what seems like a never-ending hiring spree that dovetails with Reuters' push to become more of a consumer-facing news brand.

In other news...

Ex-Rolling Stone guy Joe Levy is the new editor of Billboard. [The New York Post]

New York Times exec: "The ball is now in the Guild’s court." [Jim Romenesko]

Nick Kristof weighs in on The Village Voice attacking him for his Backpage.com coverage. [The New York Observer]

Peter Osnos on old media acting like new media. [The Atlantic Online]

Michael Wolff on "Mobile and the news media's imploding business model." [The Guardian]

No more paywall for The New Republic's website. [The New Republic]

Layoffs at TheStreet.com. [Business Insider]

Lucas Shaw and Sharon Waxman assess who might want to buy Variety. [The Wrap]