As Obama grapples with a Palestinian membership request, Bill Clinton points at Netanyahu

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Barack Obama and Mahmoud Abbas. (The National via AFP)
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Mahmoud Abbas's formal request for Palestinian membership in the U.N. was dramatic, unprecedented and not remotely close to becoming reality. The New York Times offers a good explanation of why this wish is so problematic for the United States.

Bill Clinton, away from the negotiating table, says the Israeli prime minister shoulders a good deal of the blame for letting the peace talks deterioriate.

Some links:

Lesser-established countries were granted statehood without world order being disrupted. [Steve Coll]

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