A Cuomo, a Clinton and a Mondo: A Capital week in review

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At this weekend's rally. (Photo via misschatter's flickr stream.)
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While a bunch of New Yorkers descended on Washington, D.C. this weekend, we were right here in New York preparing for the big Election Day on Tuesday. Catch up on last week's politics coverage: Here's Steve Kornacki on the governor's race, offering a Spitzer fantasy and an explanation of how Carl Paladino's nomination was made possible by Andrew Cuomo. Jimmy Vielkind on Andrew Cuomo's "urban agenda." Zachary Woolfe watching Bill Clinton on the stump for his man Cuomo. And, as for the under-the-radar races, read a conversation between Capital co-founder Josh Benson and WNYC political reporter Azi Paybarah.

There's also our "The New York Vote" video series, a project created with our partners at WNYC. We painted a portrait of the New York electorate in 2010, as explained by a cast of political players. This week, we talked to legendary pollster Mickey Carroll of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, who explained how he reads voters' minds. We also sat down with Lillian Roberts, leader of the city's largest public-employee union, who described the end of what has been a particularly tough electoral cycle for organized labor. A die-hard 2008 Obama supporter Jennifer Brumskine told us there is no "enthusiasm gap" between two years ago and 2010. Outgoing Governor David Paterson explained why Albany has a voter problem. And Michael Long, the 70-year-old chairman of the New York State Conservative Party, told us why this is a big year for the right

If that's not enough politics for you, we've got plenty more features in our archive.

For something completely different, your must-read of the day is Slate's Tom Scocca on "Project Runway" and why Mondo Guerra was the Bravo reality show's ideal protagonist.

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There's also Katharine Jose's wonderful piece in which she wonders if New York architecture has missed its moment.

Speaking of moments, our intrepid reporter Mark Hay had one when he took a dip into the Gowanus Canal for a video feature made with our friends at Thirteen.org.

For less scary theater, Mark Sullivan explained why James Earl Jones and Vanessa Redgrave couldn't steer the Broadway revivial of Driving Miss Daisy off its crash course. Mark also read Stephen Sondheim's new book, Finishing the Hat, in which the living legend reveals his own faults and fetishes, and those of other characters involved in the making of Broadway's marquee musicals.

Zachary Woolfe told us about another revivial: of "The Forty-Part Motet," an art and sound installation unlike anything you've ever experienced.

Meanwhile, Howard Megdal explained how new general manager Sandy Alderson will save the Mets. Capital co-founder and editor Tom McGeveran had some fun watching the Charlie Sheen coke-fueled hotel room drama unfold on the tabloid woods this week. And Jasmine Moy coaxed the secrets of schnitzel out of Cafe Select executive chef Stan Matusevich. Pictures of flattened beef within!