Bratton memo outlines ‘summer violence-reduction plan’

bratton-memo-outlines-summer-violence-reduction-plan
A police officer on patrol in Times Square. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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Police commissioner Bill Bratton has said he plans to temporarily reassign 400 officers to help reduce crime as the city heads into the long, hot days of summer.

Bratton offered some details about that effort, which is he calling a “summer violence-reduction plan,” in a June 30 memo to top police officials, a copy of which was obtained by Capital.

As part of the 90-day “Summer All Out” program, 400 police officers and detectives “will be temporarily assigned to patrol precincts and [Patrol Service Areas] to assist those commands in their crime suppression efforts,” Bratton wrote in the memo.

The memo is labeled as a "personnel request" and asks deputy commissioners to identify officers and detectives who could be deployed from bureaus under their command.

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The request cuts across more than two dozen bureaus and offices, including a request for 32 officers from the Internal Affairs Bureau and 18 from the office of the Deputy Commissioner for Intelligence.

Stephen Davis, a spokesman for the department, said the program is "still in the process of being assessed as to the actual number of personnel to be temporarily assigned and the units from which they will be reassigned, as well as the areas where they may be deployed."  

"This personnel reassignment plan is part of a broader review of patrol resource allocation during the next 90 day period," he said in an email. "Based on this review, the actual number of personnel to be included in the Summer All Out program may be adjusted."

The move comes as the city’s murder and crime rate continue to drop, but the number of shootings remain higher than they were last year.

The city has seen a rash of violence over the last few weekends, which critics say are early signals that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s push to reduce some police tactics that were common under the previous administration are proving dangerous.

Bratton has dismissed those critics and called the violence from the earlier weekends “unusual” and temporary.

The mayor and police commissioner have nonetheless responded to city lawmakers and others who say the citywide drop in crime doesn’t reflect how some pockets of the city are still experience a disproportionate amount of crime.

At a graduation for new police officers this week, Bratton said the city is much safer than when he first took over the department in 1994, but admitted some areas are experiencing unacceptable levels of violence, and pledged to address it.

A spokesperson for the NYPD did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

UPDATE: In a statement, the president of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, Pat Lynch, said Bratton’s initiative “is a clear and unambiguous admission that the NYPD does not have enough police officers on patrol to curb gun violence, control crime and keep the City safe.  It is a last ditch, band-aid response to the escalating gun violence and disorder in this City. City Hall has ignored the dramatically diminished staffing in the NYPD for well over a decade and now this administration is left to fix the problem. Hiring more police officers is critical to addressing this problem and it must begin immediately.”

The NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner for Public Information, Stephen Davis, said in a statement, “This program is still in the process of being assessed as to the actual number of personnel to be temporarily assigned and the units from which they will be reassigned, as well as the areas where they may be deployed. This personnel reassignment plan is part of a broader review of patrol resource allocation during the next 90 day period. Based on this review, the actual number of personnel to be included in the Summer All Out program may be adjusted."

Here is Bratton’s memo: