Teachout calls on Cuomo to answer Moreland questions

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Zephyr Teachout and her running mate, Tim Wu, called on Governor Andrew Cuomo to address a New York Times report that the governor and his aides discouraged a corruption commission from investigating entities close to the administration.

"We are here to demand that Andrew Cuomo immediately hold a press conference and answer all questions of the press and of the people of New York," said Teachout, at a press conference and rally in front of Cuomo's New York City office at 633 Third Avenue. (Cuomo's public schedule initially stated he would be in New York City today, but an updated version said the governor is in Albany.)

Teachout, who is challenging Cuomo in the Democratic primary, accused the governor of dodging the press in the hopes of avoiding questions about the Moreland Commission—a criticism also leveled by Cuomo's Republican challenger, Rob Astorino.

Teachout demanded that Cuomo explain "what his involvement was in the Moreland Commission, what he knew about what Larry Schwartz was doing, and whether or not he directed the squashing of investigations of his close friends and business associates."

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Teachout led about 30 supporters in a ragged chant of "Cuomo, come clean!"

After Teachout, Wu talked about the links between political corruption and the economy.

"Who wants to start a business in a state where you think the system is rigged?" he asked. 

"People in New York City wander around, walk around, and they look at Port Authority Bus Terminal, they look at Penn Station, and they can't understand why these places are still miserable shitholes after billions and billions in dollars in spending," he said. "And it makes people lose faith in public institutions."

About five college-aged people also attended, carrying signs that echoed Cuomo's challenge to Teachout's residency, one reading, "ZEPHYR TEACHOUT (D-VT)."

Asked who they represented, one replied, "I'm by myself." The others only shook their heads, and tried to cover their faces with their signs when cameras were pointed at them.

Teachout aides said that they had seen the same trackers at other campaign stops.