Charter school group files disclosure report [CORRECTED]

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ALBANY—Families for Excellent Schools, a group behind the push for more charter-school aid, has filed a financial disclosure report with the Joint Commission on Public Ethics revealing that it spent $115,767, mostly on advertising, creative development and lobbying starting in late February.

The filing does not yet appear on the JCOPE website, but was provided by Families for Excellent Schools spokesman Stu Loeser, after Capital incorrectly reported that the organization had filed an "undetailed" disclosure that appeared not to account for recent political activity.

That report, from Families for Excellent Schools Advocacy, an affiliated 501(c)4 organization, shows an $8,000 payment to lobbyist Patrick Jenkins, and $1,625 in payments to other employees.

CORRECTION: The original version of this article implied that Families for Excellent Schools failed to account for expenses related to lobbying. 

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The full text of the original version of this article, for reference, is here:

ALBANY—A financial disclosure report from a group behind the push for more charter-school aid appears not to account for the group's recent involvement in some high-profile political activity.

The report from Families for Excellent Schools, which funded millions of dollars' worth of ads promoting charter schools and helped organize an elaborate rally in Albany, shows an $8,000 payment to lobbyist Patrick Jenkins, and $1,625 in payments to other employees.

It does not show payments for expenses related to the March 4 rally, at which the governor appeared.

The reporting period ended Feb. 28, but usually rallies require weeks of planning and down payments.

It also does not reflect payments for the television ads, which started running Feb. 25.

Any group lobbying state or city government must report its lobbying expenses to the Joint Commission on Public Ethics.

Success Academy Charter schools filed two of an expected three reports. They also appeared not to account for much of the recent flurry of activity. The involved parties couldn't immediately be reached for comment.